Jennifer Hudson won’t pay for ex’s home

 


The ‘Voice UK’ decide has requested a decide to not grant a request from David Otunga – the daddy of her nine-year-old son David Jr. – asking that she cowl his housing prices, insisting he may afford to pay for his own residence, if he acquired a job.


Court docket paperwork obtained by The Blast slammed: ”Nothing entitles David to stay in a house equivalent to Jennifer’s.”

Jennifer insisted she has no obligation to assist the wrestler and ”denies that the baby assist ought to lengthen to housing subsidies for David when the events have been by no means married.”

 

The 37-year-old star has additionally slammed her former companion’s declare he was at all times the first caregiver for his or her son, insisting he was usually on the street with the WWE.

She additionally argued that giving David primary custody of their little boy would ”do a disservice to working mother and father”.

Her court docket paperwork acknowledged: ”[Jennifer] denies that her working and David both not working or professing to not work makes him more healthy to personally take care of the kid within the Metropolis the place the kid attends college.

”To just accept David’s proposition that as a result of he’s current, he’s a greater mum or dad can be to do a disservice to working mother and father typically and to Jennifer specifically…

”Having a baby with a celeb shouldn’t be the premise to deal with David like somebody who has given beginning to a baby and who has no technique of supporting the kid.

”Jennifer is the one who gave beginning to the minor baby, who had the minor baby together with her as she traveled previous to the difficulties the events skilled of their relationship.”

The paperwork additionally questioned whether or not David can increase their son in a protected and constant surroundings.

The ‘Highlight’ hitmaker and her former fiance – who she cut up from in 2017 – had been on account of go to trial this month however agreed to postpone to strive and attain a settlement away from the court docket.